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Septic ServicesIn Florida, most homes are connected to a municipal sewage treatment system. However, about 27 percent of housing units in the state (1.3 million families) are in areas not served by municipal systems. Properly designed, sited, built and maintained septic tanks provide an economical and efficient alternative for wastewater treatment in these areas.

People who already rely on septic services or those planning to buy a home that has, or will have, a septic system should know how to use and maintain it. Most of us tend to think that our septic tanks are working just fine if there’s no smell in adjacent ditches or our yards. But that’s not always the case.

As a homeowner, you should not only be concerned with the actual hydraulic functioning of your septic system, but you should also be concerned how your system functions environmentally. In this regard, make sure its installation and operation complies with state and county codes.

Also contact a professional septic services contractor, like us at Lee Kirk & Sons Septic, to regularly inspect your tank and, if necessary, pump it to avoid failure. Paying attention to these concerns not only keeps your system working efficiently, but you’re also helping to protect the environment.

Moreover, strive to understand the soil on your property. Contact your Soil and Water Conservation District Office, the Natural Resources Conservation Service, or the local office of the Cooperative Extension Service.

Note: Additives that are advertised as tank cleaners, primers or rejuvenators are not recommended for septic systems. In Florida, the code forbids the sale of organic chemical solvents for unclogging or degreasing septic systems.